What is a normal dating timeline

Check out our findings and what singles said below!During each normal menstrual cycle, one egg (ovum) is usually released from one of the ovaries, about 14 days after the last menstrual period. The egg is swept into the funnel-shaped end of one of the fallopian tubes.No one knows when it’s going to hit, and when it does, what’s the point of trying to twist it and mold it into some time frame that has no set dimensions?If the news isn’t enough to remind you life is fleeting, then your love should be.Recently we went on a double date with my boyfriend’s friend N, and his girlfriend.We only saw N’s girlfriend once before at his party a few months back and didn’t know much about her.If fertilization does not occur, the egg moves down the fallopian tube to the uterus, where it degenerates, and passes through the uterus with the next menstrual period.

All of this was in complete opposition to the relationship timeline I’d experienced in my one major adult relationship with my boyfriend. Case in point, my sister and brother-in-law met just 2 months before us, but they’ve been married 1 1/2 years now.

We like to put guidelines and stigmas on couples, creating extra stress and weight to the already very delicate balance of relationships. Don’t let anyone tell you you’re spending too much time in it because isn’t that the end goal of it all? Who cares if you're engaged, or you're still just “hook-up buddies” after two years.

If I've learned anything about falling in love, it's that there is no timeline to it. Life’s too short to waste another second refusing it. It's your life and your relationship, and anyone who's judging it clearly needs to get his or her own.

Everyone loves to compare notes on what’s normal when it comes to timing, but we’ve finally crunched the numbers to reveal timing norms and outliers on dating firsts!

As you’ll see in the video below, most singles have varying answers to when such events should occur in the relationship.

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